Carolyn King – The Moccasin Initiative

Carolyn King – The Moccasin Initiative

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The Moccasin Initiative is aimed at making inhabitants of Ontario province know whose indigenous community land they are occupying. mosaicedition_ea
The Moccasin Initiative is aimed at making inhabitants of Ontario province know whose indigenous community land they are occupying. mosaicedition_ea

June 25, 2017 – Toronto

The Moccasin Initiative is aimed at making inhabitants of Ontario province know whose indigenous community land they are occupying.

The Moccasin Identifier Project will in addition make children know the history of the original owners on whose land their schools were built.

On June 21 in Ontario, all the class rooms in this province will research whose land the school is built on, what year and what treaties were signed by the Crown to take over the land from their original owners.

Carolyn King of the Mississaugas Credit First Nation was at the Indigenous Arts Festival to explain the initiative and to also mark the land with the first set of moccasin stencils.

The land marked in Toronto was the traditional land of the Mississaugas Credit First Nation.

The Mississauagas Credit First Nation signed the treaty with Toronto in 1805 for the purchase of the land.

Mississaugas of The New Credit First Nation_mosaicedition_ea
Mississaugas of The New Credit First Nation_mosaicedition_ea

Carolyn King said the painting was the first time volunteers including children have used the stencils of the moccasins.

“If we as First Nations people do not get the marker on the ground today we would be lost for ever.”

Carolyn King told Mosaic Edition at the end of the marking of the land that the message of the event was to make everyone “be aware and recognize that that there were people in the early history and still here today.”

“We have all of our history to be proud of, putting up the symbols, the moccasin identifier is one of those things people can do to recognize and honour us.”

Both old and young who attended the event volunteered to mark the land of the Mississaugas Credit First Nation now part of Toronto with the stencils.

 

 

2 COMMENTS

  1. […] Its easy to get disconnected to our world. We need to get back to our original purpose in this world. Our ancestors will never be forgotten. King concluded the reading by saying if an 18 yr old woman can think like that we are going to be all right. Finally King talked about the moccasin stencil project. […]

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